Using the right plants to make gardening easier for yourself

Do you want to know the secret of good gardening? Choose the plants that work for YOU! Too many of us try to force our plants to grow in places that they just don’t enjoy.

A fern will never grow in a cactus garden!

Nowadays, there’s always a buzz about ‘hacks’ and everyone is trying to devise the next shortcut, and gardening is not alone in that! However, rather than the usual tool hacks and tips, I have put together a selection of ‘plant hacks’, these are basically plants that will solve your gardening problems for you. If that sounds pretty darn amazing to you, then I suggest you read on…

Always forgetting to water your plants?
Try some ‘Storm’™ Agapanthus!

Agapanthus ‘Storm’™

Never before has a plant put up with so much neglect, yet rewarded us for it!  The birthplace of Agapanthus is South Africa, where they grow in the open and in the shade of trees. They receive hardly any nutrients or goodness from the soil, so they’ve hard to find their own way.

Agapanthus have become a super resilient plant, popular with landscapers for their fuss-free attitude, almost zero need for water, and ability to prevent soil erosion.

Want to cover bare ground quickly and with colour?
Try Rose ‘Flower Carpet’®

Rose ‘Flower Carpet’®

Worldwide sales of the ‘Flower Carpet’ Rose Series are now almost 90 million, and as soon as you grow some for yourself, you’ll see why. Frothy ground cover with heaps of flowers ensures no ground is left bare. Change your brown border to pink, yellow, red, and white- or all of the above!

‘Flower Carpet’ are also remarkably drought tolerant, thanks to a two-tier root system. Once established, the tap roots go down deeper to capture the lower level water, something most other plants cacannott ever reach! Never before has planting up large, awkward spaces been so simple.

Want the exotic look but without the hassle?
Try the ‘Festival’™ Cordylines

Cordyline ‘Festival’™

People are often amazed at how easy Cordyline are to grow, despite their very exotic looks! Who doesn’t love a fancy rosette-forming plant with strappy foliage in dazzling colours, huh? I’m sure you’ve always wished you could grow the plants you see on holiday in your own garden?

The ‘Festival’ Cordylines are manageable plants at just 75cm high, which is quite unique for a Cordyline, and they are available in 3 terribly tropical colours! Their short height means they are almost ground covering too, and they frost hardy in most regions, and will grow in most garden soils. Despite the sun-loving impression that they give, they also grow well in dappled shade too.

What do you buy someone who seems to have everything?
Try the Hydrangea ‘Strawberries & Cream’™

Hydrangea ‘Strawberries & Cream’™

The Hydrangea that everyone can grow, whether they have a garden or not. These Gift Hydrangea are ideal for anyone, and will be longer-lasting than any gadget or aftershave that you’d usually hand over!

It’s really quite unique to have such a compact lacecap-flowered Hydrangea too, which makes it super special. Once the recipient has enjoyed the plant indoors, they can plant it outside or set it on the patio, so this is one gift they’ll never throw away!

Problems with soil erosion?
Try Canna ‘Tropicanna’®

Canna Tropicanna

Preventing soil erosion is a little-known skill of the humble Canna. Although let’s be honest, there’s nothing humble about the fresh-looking ‘Tropicanna’! Popular worldwide, highly exotic, and easily grown in wet or dry conditions.

Not only will ‘Tropicanna’ dazzle you with striped leaves and showy blooms above soil, but below the soil it will be knitting together the textures and stopping erosion, so why not consider using it on banks and slopes. Canna will also perform well as a marginal plant too, so it’s time to shock that pond!

The range of plants featured in this article are from the award winning selection of plants by Anthony Tesselaar Plants. You can find their varieties in many retail and mail order locations around the world.

 

Please note that when you see the tag ‘plant geek partners’, this indicates that a post may be sponsored or could include affiliate links.

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